The opening of the Land Run of 1889 marked the beginning of Oklahoma’s official period of statehood. It’s located at 200 Centennial Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73102, United States. The run, which began at noon on January 16, was divided into 17 different sections. In order to claim your land and make it yours, you needed to be present in person when the land commissioner came out to mark your section. In addition to exploring the vastness that comes along with land ownership, this also gave Oklahomans an opportunity to explore their new locale. An estimated 250,000 people participated in the run and as a result, only 230 people were able to claim a section through purchase. That is why it was so important for others who did not get chosen or were unable to make it out there themselves—their families and friends—to show up at a later date with proof that they owned the land where their ancestor lived before them. This is why there are many stories about people showing up on behalf of distant relatives only after having heard about their deeds from another relative living far away. There are even stories about Oklahoma City’s own centennial land run legend, John P. Beatty: He had been working as a clerk at an auction house in New York and witnessed one man buying 76 acres for $40 in cash because he knew his grandfather had purchased 160 acres for $100 five years prior but had since passed away without leaving behind any legal documentation regarding his ownership rights over those lands. 

What to Know Before Visiting the Centennial Land Run Monument

Located on the grounds of the Oklahoma Historical Society, the Oklahoma City Centennial Land Run monument is an interactive experience that tells the story of Oklahoma’s most famous land run. However, visitors are encouraged to explore the grounds and learn more about the city’s rich history. The only one of its kind, this monument is the result of an incredible collaboration between the Oklahoma Historical Society and the Oklahoma City Public Library. In order to make the most out of your time at the monument, it is recommended that visitors first read the monument’s informational placards as a way to get a better understanding of the monument’s story. Afterwards, visitors can make their way around the monument, exploring the exhibit’s interactive exhibits and learning more about the story of the land run. 

Tips for visiting the Centennial Land Run Monument

-Dress appropriately for the weather—While visitors can experience some of Oklahoma’s warmest weather on the grounds of the Oklahoma Historical Society, spring and fall are generally the warmest times of the year. -Explore the grounds -Visitors are encouraged to explore the grounds of the monument and explore its interactive exhibits, which include a map of Oklahoma City’s historical sites and a timeline of Oklahoma’s history, before making their way around the monument. -Allow time to explore -Visitors are encouraged to make the most of their time at the monument, taking the time to explore its interactive exhibits and explore the grounds before making their way around the monument. -Bring a guide -Though the monument is an incredible experience, which includes opportunities for visitors to explore Oklahoma City’s rich history and commemorate the centennial land run in an interactive way, it is recommended that visitors bring a guide or learn more about the state’s history at the Oklahoma Historical Society. 

See and Do at the Oklahoma City Centennial Land Run Monument

The Centennial Land Run monument is a stunning experience that highlights Oklahoma’s rich history, including the land run that brought the state into existence. Visitors to the monument are encouraged to explore the grounds and explore the monument’s interactive exhibits, which include a map of Oklahoma City’s historical sites and a timeline of Oklahoma’s history, before making their way around the monument. – Explore the grounds – Visitors are encouraged to explore the grounds of the monument and explore its interactive exhibits, which include a map of Oklahoma City’s historical sites and a timeline of Oklahoma’s history, before making their way around the monument. – Allow time to explore – Visitors are encouraged to make the most of their time at the monument, taking the time to explore its interactive exhibits and explore the grounds before making their way around the monument. – Bring a guide – Though the monument is an incredible experience, which includes opportunities for visitors to explore Oklahoma City’s rich history and commemorate the centennial land run in an interactive way, it is recommended that visitors bring a guide or learn more about the state’s history at the Oklahoma Historical Society. 

How to Drive to the Centennial Land Run Monument

From I-44, take Exit 52, which will take you to NW 63rd Street. From there, drive north along NW 63rd Street for two blocks, until you reach NW 6th Avenue. The Oklahoma Historical Society is located at NW 6th Avenue and Robinson Avenue.